The Speckled Axe

"I found the difficulty of obtaining good and breaking bad habits in other points of vice and virtue, have given up the struggle, and concluded that a speckled axe was best…" -Benjamin Franklin
latimes:

Rise in crime intensifies unease in once-safe Egypt: Egyptians say they don’t recognize the country now, a place with carjackings, soccer melees and brazen bank robberies.
Photo:   A woman passes a mural in Cairo depicting unidentified soccer fans slain at this month’s riot in Port Said. The bloodshed underscored a new kind of cruelty in Egypt. Credit: Nasser Nasser / Associated Press

latimes:

Rise in crime intensifies unease in once-safe Egypt: Egyptians say they don’t recognize the country now, a place with carjackings, soccer melees and brazen bank robberies.

Photo: A woman passes a mural in Cairo depicting unidentified soccer fans slain at this month’s riot in Port Said. The bloodshed underscored a new kind of cruelty in Egypt. Credit: Nasser Nasser / Associated Press

(Source: Los Angeles Times)

fotojournalismus:

A protester threw stones at Israeli troops firing tear gas outside Ofer Prison in the West Bank Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2012. Demonstrators rallied in support of Palestinian prisoner Khader Adnan, who has been detained without being charged; he agreed Tuesday to end a 66-day hunger strike in exchange for being freed in April.
[Credit : Abbas Momani/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images]

fotojournalismus:

A protester threw stones at Israeli troops firing tear gas outside Ofer Prison in the West Bank Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2012. Demonstrators rallied in support of Palestinian prisoner Khader Adnan, who has been detained without being charged; he agreed Tuesday to end a 66-day hunger strike in exchange for being freed in April.

[Credit : Abbas Momani/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images]

latimes:

Gun culture spreads in India: Indians own about 40 million guns, second only to the U.S. Rising incomes, along with crime and fear of terrorist attacks, have fueled firearms purchases.
Photo:   A couple headed to their field in Noney village in January rely on a gun for safety in light of tensions before elections in India’s Manipur state. Credit: European Pressphoto Agency

They’re also on the rise in terms of using gas guzzling automobiles. The United States isn’t a model other rising nations should follow!

latimes:

Gun culture spreads in India: Indians own about 40 million guns, second only to the U.S. Rising incomes, along with crime and fear of terrorist attacks, have fueled firearms purchases.

Photo: A couple headed to their field in Noney village in January rely on a gun for safety in light of tensions before elections in India’s Manipur state. Credit: European Pressphoto Agency

They’re also on the rise in terms of using gas guzzling automobiles. The United States isn’t a model other rising nations should follow!

(Source: Los Angeles Times)

I think the reports of my survival may be exaggerated. I’m in Babo Amr. Sickening, trying to understand how the world can stand by and I should be hardened by now. Watched a baby die today. Shrapnel, doctors could do nothing. His little tummy just heaved and heaved until it stopped. Feeling helpless. As well as cold! Will keep trying to get out the information.

—Slain reporter Marie Colvin’s last dispatch, posted to a Facebook group for conflict journalists and rights reporters. She was killed this morning in a mortar attack. (via newsweek)

(via newsweek)

Babaamr is facing a genocide right now. I will never forgive you for your silence. You all have just give us your words but we need actions. However our hearts will always be with those who risk their life for our freedom. I know what we need! We need campaigns everywhere inside Syria and outside Syria, and now we need all people in front of all embassies all over the world. In a few hours there will be NO place called BabaAmr and I expect this will be my last message and no one will forgive you who talked but didn’t act.

One of Syrian citizen journalist Rami Al-Sayed’s last messages. The 27-year-old Al-Sayed, who bravely documented what was going on in the wartorn city of Homs, was actively targeted by the regime’s shelling according to activists. He ran a live feed of the bombardment of his city, out of the neighborhood of Bab Amro, and according to activists: “Five days ago, the regime’s army became aware of his live broadcast and his location, and targeted him with artillery shells.” They finally succeeded in silencing him today. He leaves behind a one-and-a-half year old daughter named Maryam. (via thepoliticalnotebook)

(via thepoliticalnotebook)

fotojournalismus:

Rémi Ochlik’s Photojournalism (via Guardian)

Remi Ochlik, 28, who has been killed in Homs alongside the veteran war reporter Marie Colvin, was an award-winning French photojournalist, considered one of the biggest talents of a new generation of photographer-reporters.

Last month he won a World Press Photo award for Battle for Libya, his series from the Libyan uprising.

Born in Lorraine in the east of France, Ochlik had always wanted to be a war photographer. He made his name aged 20, while still at photography college in Paris, when he went to Haiti in 2004 to document the riots and bloody conflict surrounding the fall of president Jean-Bertrand Aristide. He won a prestigious award for young reporters and later co-founded his own photography agency, IP3 Press, which covered both foreign news and French politics. In 2008, he covered war in the Democratic Republic of Congo and returned to Haiti in 2010 to document the cholera epidemic.

In 2011, he covered the Arab spring in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya, publishing work in Paris Match, Le Monde, Time magazine and the Wall Street Journal. Last December his work from the Arab spring won a major award in Lille.

Jean-François Leroy, head of Visa pour l’Image, a major French international photojournalism festival, had shown Ochlik’s early work from Haiti, saying of him at the time: “Someone showed me this work on the events in Haiti. It was very beautiful, very strong. I didn’t know the guy who’d done it. I asked him to come in. He’s called Remi Ochlik, he’s 20. He worked all alone, like a big guy. There you go. Photojournalism is not dead.”

Ochlik had said of his war photography: “I expected to see horrible things. Yes, I was afraid.”

Alfred de Montesquiou, a journalist for Paris Match, who returned from Syria a few days ago, said Ochlik had emailed him recently saying: “I’ve just arrived in Homs, it’s night. The situation seems to be extremely tense and desperate. The Syrian army is sending back-up at the moment and the situation will get worse, according to what the rebels tell us. I’ll keep you posted.”

De Montesquiou said Ochlik was “anything but hot-headed” and that he carefully considered each decision. “He was someone extremely calm, almost cold even, very thoughtful.”

The Socialist French presidential candidate, François Hollande, issued a statement deploring the journalists’ deaths and the violence in Syria, adding: “This death touches me even more because Remi Ochlik was accredited to [cover] my campaign and was among us a few days ago.” 

Angelique Chrisafis, The Guardian. 

[Also check out the related news on RSF’s website.]

Edit :Parting Glance: Rémi Ochlik” by NYT’s Lens Blog. Take a look.

Photos : 

1. Remi Ochlik, who was killed in Homs, Syria, on 22 February 2012. (Credit : Yoan Valat/EPA)

2. Rebel forces fight Muammar Gaddafi’s troops on a road outside Ras Lanouf, Libya, 11 March 2011.

3. The largest anti-government demonstration in modern Egyptian history, Cairo, 3 February 2011.

4. Rebels fighters from Jebel Nafusa and Misrata enter Gaddafi’s headquarters for the last assault against the leader on 23 August 2011.

5. Port-au-Prince, Haiti, 10 November 2010.

[Credit : Remi Ochlik/Bureau233/Eyevine]

Rémi and his work will be sorely missed.